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Angel Blue January 2013

Puccini Tosca

From 01 July TO 19 July 2024
Covent Garden - London
Program

Puccini : Tosca 125 mn

Cast
  • Conductor
    Andrea Battistoni
  • Director
    Jonathan Kent
  • Performers
    Floria Tosca: Angel Blue
    Mario Cavaradossi: Russell Thomas
    Il Barone Scarpia: Ludovic Tézier
    Il Sagrestano: Jeremy White
    Spoletta: Colin Judson
    Cesare Angelotti: Germán E. Alcántara
BOOKING ON REQUEST

For all booking requests, please contact us by e-mail, specifying the city, the date and the number of tickets required at [email protected]

  • Venue Info
  • Seating Plan
  • Synopsis

Covent Garden - London Location Bow Street, Covent Garden - WC2E 9DD London Royaume-Uni

  • Venue's Capacity: 2256

Covent Garden's lyrical tradition goes back to the eighteenth century. It is here, for example, in a theatre constructed in 1732 by John Rich, the successful producer of THE BEGGAR'S OPERA, that the London public discovered several of Handel's operas.

Covent Garden then also staged plays and pantomime, a tradition which continued well into the thirties. The theatre has since hosted the most diverse productions, including cinema, cabaret, ice shows, and the circus. Today only opera and dance (The Royal Ballet) share the season.

As is the case with many an opera house. Covent Garden's life history was interrupted by fire, which twice destroyed the building. The second Royal Opera was inaugurated in 1809. Weber composed OBERON for the theatre, and conducted its premiere in 1826; the next year, Beethoven's F ID EU o was staged. From 1847, Covent Garden most often scheduled the Italian repertoire, with works by Rossini and Verdi. After the fire that demolished the second theatre in 1856, and until 1914, the third opera house built on the Covent Garden site became known as the theatre that hired the world's leading artists (like Nellie Melba, Caruso, and Adelina Patti, who refused all rehearsals by contract), and paid them royally. Several legendary conductors furthered the Royal Opera House's reputation after the First World War, such as Bruno Walter, and, of course, Thomas Beecham, who introduced the opera of Richard Strauss.

During the Second World War, Covent Garden became a "Palais de Dance" (sic). At the end of the war, following an intense period of negogiations. the ambitious decision was made to found a permanent opera company. Karl Rankl was appointed the first Music Director of the Covent Garden Opera Company (it became The Royal Opera in 1968) which gave its first performance in 1947.

Rankl's successors - Rafael Kubelik, Georg Solti, Colin Davis, and Bernard Haitink - have managed to maintain the company spirit and even the most celebrated guest artists are obliged to attend rehearsals.

Covent Garden

The seating plan is given as an indication and has no contractual value.
The division of categories may differ depending on shows and dates.

Synopsis

Tosca

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TOSCA, A UNIVERSALLY ADORED OPERA
This popular opera by Giacomo Puccini was premiered at Rome's famous Teatro Costanzi in 1900.
In three acts and sung to a libretto by Giuseppe Giacosa an Luigi Illica, the opera is about lovers who are threatened by and evil police chief at the time of Napoleon's invasion of Italy in 1800.
With all the ingredients of an epic drama including murder, torture and suicide, this exceptional opera has inspired some amazing performances by many top stars.
Based on a play written in 1887 by French writer Victorien Sardou, it took Puccini over four years to make the long, meandering play into a concise three act opera.

THE HISTORY
A tale based on the love affair of and acclaimed singer, Floria Tosca and Mario Cavaradossi in times of political unrest in Rome. The evil Baron Scarpia wants Floria for himself and tricks her into giving him information that leads to her lovers arrest. Promising that she and Cavaradossi will escape, he tricks Floria into letting her lover stand in front of a firing squad by saying that the bullets will be blank. After he trys to seduce her, Floria stabs the Baron and rushes to the prison. He has tricked her and Cavaradossi is shot. Seeing no alternative, Floria commits suicide.

Act 1
Trying to escape, one time Roman Consul-General, Cesare Angelotti tells his friend Cavaradossi that he is wanted by evil police chief, Baron Scarpia. Cavaradossi hides him down a well in his garden and Floria, his lover overhears. He confides in her. The act ends with a canon signalling that Angelotti's escape has been discovered.

Act 2
Baron Scarpia sends a note to Floria asking her to come to his apartment at supper time. A rival for her affection, he is determined to win Floria away from Cavaradossi. He tries to interrogate her about Angelotti's hiding place and has Cavaradossi tortured within her hearing to persuade her to give up the information. She tells him where Angelotti is hidden as she can stand her lover's pain no longer. Cavaradossi is furious with Floria for betraying him and his friend, and he is taken away to prison. She manages to get the Baron to promise that he will allow her and Cavaradossi to escape from the city if she surrenders to his advances, and he agrees on condition that Cavaradossi is subjected to a mock execution.
The Baron arranges this with one of his men, Spoletta and gives Floria a letter to ensure the safe escape of her and her lover. News comes that Angelotti has killed himself. The Baron tries to force himself on Floria and she stabs him.

Act 3
Floria rushes to the prison to tell Cavaradossi that he will need to go in front of a firing squad but that the guns will contain blank bullets. However, the Baron has tricked her and the bullets are real. When Cavaradossi has been shot Floria commits suicide.

THE MAIN ROLES
Floria Tosca - an opera singer - Soprano
Mario Cavaradossi - a painter and political activist - Tenor
Baron Scarpia - chief of police - Baritone
Cesare Angelotti - a political prisoner who has escaped -Bass

Royal Opera House © Rob Moore

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