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Der Fliegender Holländer ©Thomas Jauck

Wagner Der fliegende Holländer

From 15 May TO 29 May 2020
Deutsche Oper - Berlin
Program

Wagner : Der fliegende Holländer

2 h 15 Sung in : German
Cast
  • Conductor
    Ivan Repusic
  • Director
    Christian Spuck
  • Performers
    Der Holländer: Michael Volle
    Senta: Ingela Brimberg
    Erik: Robert Watson
    Daland: Tobias Kehrer
    Der Steuermann: Matthew Newlin
    Mary: Ronnita Miller
Details on the Performance

The Dutchman is a cursed man, a driven man, an outsider. Richard Wagner encountered this stateless figure in the pages of Heinrich Heine, who suffused the romantic material with his characteristic irony. Wagner was uninterested in Heine’s broader storyline, which downplayed the Dutchman material. Wagner immersed himself in the story of the mysterious mariner, drawing for his first opera on this tale of a man searching for a woman who can offer him redemption. Roving restlessly in the borderlands of Life and Death, the Dutchman meets Senta, a woman who, in her own way, appears alien and without a place to call home and is yearning for a male character, a figment of her own fantasy – the Dutchman. The world is one of dream images, obsessions, projections and the fantastic, a world that has long since lost touch with reality. The character most affected by all this is the huntsman, Erik, arguably the only person in the story who is genuinely in love, but he is unable to reach the other characters, which are lost in their dreams. Written in 1841 and first performed in Dresden in 1843, Wagner’s opera builds on the tradition of German romantic operas as espoused by Weber and Marschner and is a departure from the grand opera style of his previous opera, RIENZI. Yet despite his mainstream approach, the work is an indication of Wagner’s development as a musical dramatist – and the first to place Wagner’s prime preoccupation, redemption through love in death, at the center of proceedings.

Source © Deutsche Oper Berlin

  • Venue Info
  • Seating Plan
  • Synopsis

Deutsche Oper - Berlin Location Bismarckstrasse 35 - 10627 Berlin Allemagne

  • Venue's Capacity: 1859

The Venue's History in few words …

Contrary to the Staatsoper Unter den Linden which was founded in the eighteenth century in the centre of town and for a long time considered the Royal Opera, the history of the Berlin Opera began in 1912, in the Charlottenburg neighborhood situated outside the city limits, and intitiated by the rich bourgeoisie. But the inevitable occured, following the economic crisis of World War I, and the Charlottenburg Opera was ultimately purchased by the City of Berlin.

 

Bruno Walter greatly improved the musical qualities of this institution which was rebaptized the Städtische Oper (City Opera). Prior to that, Carl Ebert, as administrator (with Rudolf Bing, the future legendary director of the MET in New York, as assistant), promoted more modern music, including those operas by Kurt Weill or Schreker which Klemperer could no longer perform at the then-closed Kr oll-Oper, and which provoked the ire of the Nazis as early as 1933. In 1945, the building was left in ruins, but by the month of August 45, the company presented FIDELIO at the « Theater des Westerns » and animated that theatre until 1961. During this period, the conductor Ferenc Fricsay, named music director, enabled the Städtische Oper to regain its international ranking, alternating standard repertoire in top-quality productions (where voices such as Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau or Josef Greindl were discovered), works by Stravinsky and Hindemith (who were banned by the Nazis), and world premieres. But in 1955, the Opera Unter den Linden, situated in East Germany, reopened under the name of the Deutsche Staatsoper. Under the influence of this politico-artistic competition, three decisions were made : the Städtische Oper was rebaptized the Deutsche Oper Berlin, plans were made to construct a theatre at the Charlottenburg site (situated in West Berlin), and Carl Ebert who, in the mean­time founded the Glyndebourne Festival, was called back. His productions and season programmes turned West Berlin into one of contemporary opera's main capitals.

Deutsche Oper

Synopsis

Der fliegende Holländer

 

Der fliegende Holländer opera is the most interesting and attention grabbing play, set in French background and translated to various languages across the world. Der fliegende Holländer has been revived from the ancient age to present day performance. This has made the play to be more dramatic and humorous. In the past,

Le hollandais volant was sometimes referred to as the Dutch fielder and which is the most renowned as the ghost ship. It is also referred to as " Der fliegende Holländer" in German, which is the unique heading of the play by Richard Wagner. 

HISTORY
The history of the play is deep and not easy to trace the facts of its origin. The action takes place in the Cape of Good Hope, where the Dutch ship is caught in a snowstorm. Captain Daland is begged by the crew to look for a safe haven but he refuses and locks himself in the log cabin. The storm still increase and the captain defy the heaven to submerge the vessel. The play was revived in 1834 by a German playwright Heinrich Heine. The play was further changed to another version in 1843 by Richard Wagner.

Act 1
An aggressive storm blows the Norwegian fishing vessel away from home. The captain urges his crew to rest and leaves a youthful steersman in control, whom falls into slumber. All of a sudden a galleon drops an anchor to the boat. Captain Daland vows to navigate around the Cape of Good Hope. He is determined to get a lady who will be true to him till his demise. The captain later meets the Flying Dutchman, who later promises to marry Dalands daughter. The captain leads the Dutchman to his residence.

Act 2
The story of the Flying Dutchman is well-known. A portrait of him is hanged in the team leader's house, the women teases Senta about her lover, Erik. Mary declines to amuse the girls narrating the story of the Dutchman with a song. Erik comes in to announce the return of Daland boat, and the sailors are welcomed by the women. With a lot of anxiety Erik declares his love for Senta. Finally Senta leaves Erik and accepts the Dutchman proposal of falling in love with her, and this makes Daland to rejoice.

Act 3
The Daland vessel and the Dutchman's ship are anchored at the dockside, where the Norwegian women bring foodstuffs and drinks to the Dutchman's ship. Regardless of their mockery, no one replies to them. Out of fear the women hands in the food to Norwegian men in its place. Senta finally runs to the quayside and Erik follows her, who is hopeless that she has abandoned him to an alien. The scene ends with the vanishing of the Dutch ship and the crew. Finally Senta meets the Dutchman.

MAIN ROLES
John Michael Watcher, the Dutchman, bass-baritone
Wilhelmine Schroder-Devrient, Senta, Daland's daughter, soprano

Friedrich Traugott, Daland, a Norwegian Sea Captain, bass
Carl Risse, Erik, a huntsman, tenor
Wenzel Bielezizky, Daland's steersman,tenor
Therese Watcher, Mary, Senta's nurse, contralto.

Deutsche Oper

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